May Garlic Mustard Pull

 

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Robb Cleave, Volunteer Coordinator at the Forest Preserve District, demonstrates how to remove Garlic Mustard.

Removing invasive species is important for our local environment. Garlic Mustard is an especially invasive species that affect states all over the country, specifically afflicting our local forest preserves as well! Earlier this month, the Forest Preserve District collaborated with Aurora Christian School’s students to remove Garlic Mustard from Elburn Forest Preserve!

For many invasive plants, specifically Garlic Mustard, removal is the most effective treatment. Garlic Mustard has shallow roots, which allow it to grow upward very quickly and shade out its surrounding native plants. Luckily, the shallow roots make it easy to pull out of the ground, preventing it from reseeding for the next year. At this removal, a few students and employees of the Forest Preserve District worked together to pull the Garlic Mustard population at the forest preserve. There was a larger population of the invasive plant in the area, but together they were able to pull over 200 lbs. of Garlic Mustard, and even observe some wildlife along the way!

Looking to remove this plant from your yard or a local natural area? Be sure to have trash bags ready for storage of the plants during removal, and remove the entire root system, not just the stem, so there is a chance the plant can regrow. Fun fact: after you’re done with removal, you can make a meal with your gatherings! Garlic Mustard has historically been used as an herb in many recipes- but be sure to cook it first. At the end of the day, you’ll have done your local environment- and dinner- a favor!

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Aurora Christian students pose with the garbage bags of garlic mustard they pulled.

 

Interested in volunteering with the Forest Preserve District? We host many invasive species removals as well as many other events! Check us out at http://www.kaneforest.com to learn more about how you can help!

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